Danvers State Insane Asylum

Danvers State Lunatic Asylum

Location: Danvers, Massachusetts (aka Salem Village until 1752)

According to the historyofmassachusetts.org, the Danvers State Lunatic Asylum was built between 1874 and 1878. The land on which it was built is called Hathorne Hill after Judge John Hathorne of the Salem Witch Trials who had lived there. The land was purchased from a farmer, Francis Dodge, in the 1870s. It cost $1.5 million to build the asylum at a time when America was still recovering from their Civil War. Over time approximately 40 buildings went up to house TB patients, staff, the medical building, machine shops, two nursing homes, a pump house, cemetery, and cottages, many were connected by underground tunnels. read more

Alton Mental Health Hospital

Alton Mental Health Hospital

Location: Alton, Illinois

In 1916 forty patients moved into the hospital prior to its opening in 1917. The hospital continued to grow in response to the needs of the surrounding area and by the 1930s  the hospital had opened a ward for WWI veterans, another for civilian men, another for women and a separate ward as a Tuberculosis Sanitarium. The 1940s brought electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) into fashion for those suffering from mental illness. The 1950s saw the practice of lobotomies used on the mentally ill. read more

Insane Asylum Horror

In this post, we will take a walk through an abandoned insane asylum. Abandoned asylums must be the spookiest type of buildings to visit. In the past, I have spent time visiting within the walls of an asylum that was still operating and that was unsettling enough.

The unsettling and spooky feeling likely comes from the combination of the asylum architecture and the mental illnesses that the patients experience.

I admire the professionals that work with and help the patients and I admire the strength of those that suffer from mental illness and have to deal with not only the symptoms but the societal stigma and judgement that comes with their illness. read more

Winchester Mystery House

The Winchester Mystery House is just that; a mystery. Why would Sarah Winchester have the house built, adjusted, and rebuilt constantly between 1884 and 1922? Was she a genius? Or was Sarah Winchester under the influence of the spirits it is said she was terrified of? Let’s explore Sarah and her mystery house and decide from there.

Sarah Pardee

Sarah Winchester was born Sarah Pardee in September 1839, in New Haven, Connecticut. Sarah grew into a charming, multi-lingual, musically talented that was a petite beauty of only 4’10” tall. Sarah was bred, born, and raised in New Haven.

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House of the Seven Gables

When it comes to seeing old houses in the United States Salem, Massachusetts has an abundance of them. In this post, we are going to learn about the Turner-Ingersoll Mansion also known as the House of the Seven Gables. The home is immense in size and has been refurbished and preserved to its original state. It has a link to the American literary figure, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and through him a link to the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. Its history is long and storied and even holds some paranormal activity. Yay! Ghosts! My favourite. read more